Cargando...

Ver imagen grande

Chris Thomas King - It's A Cold Ass World (The Beginning)

Cod.artículo: 9020


Precio: $10.00

CD 9020


Chris Thomas King, who delivered a stellar performance as Tommy Johnson in the Coen Brothers' film "O Brother, Where Art Thou?", started his career playing guitar at his father's nightclub, Tabby's Blues Box in Baton Rouge, La. His contemporaries could not understand why he was playing "anachronistic" blues in the days of disco. Folklorist Nick Spitzer suggested that he make a record to show his friends that there was prestige in the blues. These are his first recordings, the result of that urging ‚ thus the subtitle "The Beginning."

1. The Blues Is Back
2. Soon In The Morning
3. Cheatin' Women Blues
4. Cocaine
5. Mary Jane
6. Take Yo Time
7. Going Home To Louisana
8. South Side Shuffle
9. You'll Be Sorry, Babe
10. Don't Work Too Hard

REVIEW

“Baton Rouge native Chris Thomas King lets go on It’s a Cold Ass World – The Beginning.  He sang as Tommy Johnson in O Brother, Where Art Thou? And testifies that ‘The Blues is Back’ on this follow-up recording to the Coen Brothers’ film.  King is the real deal.  Give a listen to his blistering guitar work on ‘Soon This Morning,’ and his uncanny sense of time as he shifts from guitar solo to hand clap backup. ‘Cheatin’ Woman Blues’ seems clear proof of Hendrix’s influence, and boy, is this ever sweet.  It’ll set you back on your heels, alright.

Rockin’ blues on ‘Mary Jane’ makes it plain that King can boogie as well as sear the soul.  Nick Spitzer refers to Buddy Guy’s ‘country blues gone electric’ influence on King.  That is there, but again let me reference Hendrix. Think back to tunes that started off fairly spare of notes and built seductively and imperceptibly until you were thinking, ‘Oh, my, what’s this? What’s happening with this music?’ It’s been awhile since I’ve heard such a personal, innovative interpretation of the blues.  Chris Thomas King, growing up off Louisiana’s stretch of Highway 61 seems to have the gift.”

– Richard Dorsett, Victory Review